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Waiting List

Waiting List Image

Waiting List Information

Our waiting list is a mailchimp list whereby we can send an email to all our waiting list subscribers who would like to know when we have some chickens for sale.

We have been inundated with requests for chickens for sale ever since Covid-19 has taken over the newsreels of the world. We have restocked twice but still we have sold out. Our suppliers have exhausted their supplies and we have no more available. Chicken availability at this time is somewhat of a problem but we are addressing it.

Our chicken availability is normally timed so that we can meet our normal demand levels. This year has caught us unawares. We normally hatch from our own breeding flock at this time of year and this year is no different. Our incubators are now filled with eggs and hatching is on the cards, however, sexing these chicks to determine the boys from the girls is not possible until they are 6-8 weeks old.

Up to now, we have had some multi-coloured breeds of commercial hybrids and some Muirfield Black Rock, Brown Rock and Utility Sussex. We are now incubating Cochin, Brahma, Swedish Flower Hens, Coronation Sussex and Salmon Faverolles.

Essential things to do while you are waiting

While you are on our waiting list, you may wish to research good chicken husbandry minimum requirements. Chickens don’t require much but they do require the correct care to enable them to lay well and remain healthy.

It is coming to our attention that some people are of the opinion that they can just dump chickens in the garden and they will stroll around popping out some eggs every day. Nothing could be further from the truth. Their welfare needs to be high priority. Chickens require housing for safety and weather protection. You need to feed your chickens well with a diet that is best suited for avian digestive systems. Feeding them household scraps is not allowed and is certainly not going to give them a diet which will make them most productive or healthy. Based on the saying rubbish in, rubbish out. With hens it is definitely rubbish in, nothing out.

Most important is how to avoid your new hens from becoming a convenient takeway snack for a hungry fox or badger. Check out our chicken foxproofing post for tips to safeguard your chickens

How to get notified of new stock

Please use our Contact page to be added to our waiting list. Tick the waiting list option along with the opt-in to give us permission to contact you. Our mailing lists, which are infrequent, have an easy unsubscribe link to unsubscribe at any time. We do not wish to annoy you by emailing you unnecessarily. Please know that we take your privacy very seriously and will not spam you without permission. As we say, spam is for fritters and we hate fritters.

Latest Stock

Just hatched chicks

Latest Stock for sale

This post is here to show you at a glance what we have going on and what is the latest chicken availability for sale.

Hatching Commencing from spring 2020

The incubators are now on for 2020 and we will be hatching every 3 weeks. Any chicks that are sold are either sold as sexed or unsexed. Some breeds are easier to tell than others. If we sell as sexed we offer a female guarantee so if they turn out to be boys they will be swapped or refunded. We don’t replace for those sold as unsexed as it’s a risk the buyer needs to consider before going down the unsexed day old chick route.

Newly hatching chicks
Hatching day for chicks at Hedgerow Henporium

Breeds available as at May 25th 2020

We hatched some hybrids in March 2020 and we should be able to sort the males and females out shortly. Please register on our contact form to go on the waiting list to be notified as soon as the available to be released for sale. See stock list below

This coming year 2020 we are planning to have the following breeds available. Chicken availability will consequently change during the year due to popularity. We hatch most of these ourselves from hatching eggs which we breed from our own chickens. The Muirfield breeds are genuine stock which come from Scotland. Deliveries of these are available as chicks or even at point of lay.  Point of lay are usually only here by special order unless we have raised them from chicks ourselves. If you want point of lay Muirfield layers stock as a special order, we will need a deposit beforehand to secure them however these have been in very short supply in 2019 and so far in 2020. Please click here to ask us for details.

Stock List

  • Hedgerow Hybrids see below list
  • Blue, White Leghorn, Partridge Leghorn, Buff Barred, Cuckoo, Speckledy, Blacktail, Goldilocks, Rhode Rock, Sussex Rock, Light Sussex, Skyline, Splash Lavender
  • Cochin  – HATCHING SOON.
  • Brahma – Boys only left 1 buff columbian Brahma, HATCHING SOON.
  • Swedish Flower Hens – AVAILABLE SOON
  • Faverolles – HATCHING SOON.
  • Black Rock Muirfield – SOLD OUT – awaiting further deliveries
  • Brown Rock Muirfield – SOLD OUT – awaiting further deliveries
  • Utility Sussex Muirfield – SOLD OUT – awaiting further deliveries
  • Hedgerow Homemades – HATCHING SOON.
  • Hatching eggs NOW AVAILABLE FOR COLLECTION ONLY

Moulting -Now you see them now you don’t

What is a Moult?

Moulting is an annual phenomenon in approx 18 months and older hens. In reality, she will experience her first full moult in her second Autumn, and then every year after that.

What happens?

Bam! At a time when you think that hens actually need a good feather covering, almost overnight, the coop looks like an explosion in a pillow factory. The girls drop feathers like it’s a drunken pool party in Ibiza. They also renew the scales on their legs too. It can be quite upsetting for people who have not kept hens before, to see how sad they look when they are stripped of their finery. Hens can look really unkempt and uncared for when this happens. The reverse is true, as they are provided with more protein and are not handled too much to avoid pressing the newly forming quills back into their skin. This is the reality of keeping hens.

Once the feathers start to regrow, the hen will look like a pincushion. The incoming feather shafts are called pin or blood feathers. They are dark and look almost blue. In reality, they are filled with blood which is nourishing the newly forming feathers within the shafts. The pin feathers are very easy to damage and can bleed profusely if broken.

Her comb will shrivel and become pink instead of red. Her face will also go less red than normal. This is in response to the reduction in hormones.

A moulting hen will lose condition, she will look quite dejected if she finds herself at the bottom of the pecking order. Other changes in her body will occur such as reversal of the bleaching phenomenon which removed the colour from legs, skin, and vent areas. Legs, skin and vent will return to the original colour as occurs in a non-laying hen.

This affects the pecking order

When a hen moults, her status within the flock plummets, and hens who were once high up in the pecking order will find themselves struggling to find any peace. They are often in hiding places and are unable to eat when they want. This becomes an ideal opportunity for a lower ranking hen who may not yet be moulting, to seize power. Sometimes these once meek hens, turn into little monsters and can really give the shrinking ex-head chickens a really hard time.

In the normal ranking or pecking order the head chicken (always a girl by the way) eats first, then number 2, then number 3 etc. The lowest ranking hens must wait until all the others have eaten and even then must be given permission by those of a higher rank. Such is the life of a lowly hen.

Why do the hens stop laying

A moulting hen needs good quality protein in her food as protein makes feathers, to conjure up new growth. Egg production also uses a lot of protein, therefore, no eggs will be laid for the duration of the moult. Something has to give, as all the protein has to be diverted to their feathering needs. A full moult can last 8 weeks with some hens taking much longer. The moult coincides with the shortening of days which in itself can trigger a shut-off the egg-laying hormones. These will normally be reactivated once the days start to lengthen again after Christmas. Lack of eggs seems like a sort of curse, but it is a good thing. It gives the hens a well-deserved break from the rigours of laying for a few weeks.

Keep your hens on layers pellets during the moult as the calcium will help top up her depleted reserves and the additional protein it contains will be beneficial for the feather production.

Moulting at other times

A mini or partial moult, usually a neck moult or a chest moult, can occur due to stress. Stress can anything from a predator fright, or extremes in the weather, too hot, very wet, very windy. Firework, loud banging, DIY, dogs, or cats will take their toll. It can be caused by you wearing the wrong wellies, or a change in the environment. Getting the picture? Chickens are stressy creatures. Stress can depress their immune response and egg laying can also be interrupted or erratic for a while.

Day-old Chicks

Newly hatched chicks

Day old chicks need special care

Looking after day-old chicks is a rewarding experience for everyone, no matter their age. However, there are some things that needs to be in place before you contemplate looking after dayold chicks in your home.

The list below is considerations that need to be addressed BEFORE embarking on this exciting adventure.

  • Day old chicks are delicate and can easily die
  • Young chicks need a heat source in their first weeks
  • Day-old chicks can drown in a water source
  • Chicks need to be kept indoors for at least 3 weeks in summer
  • They must be indoors for longer when the weather is cold
  • Chicks need cleaning out regularly otherwise they will smell
  • Raising young chicks indoors creates massive amounts of heavy dust from their feathers. This can cause breathing issues in sensitive individuals
  • Dayold chicks cannot be sexed until they are 6-8 weeks old
  • This is a risk that you will get cockerels which can cause neighbour issues
  • Most important if we have sold them unsexed we cannot take the boys back due to a biosecurity risk for our stock.

All our day-old chicks get sent to their new homes with a full care sheet. The minimum needs are listed below.

  1. Brooder to contain the dayolds. Rabbit or hamster cage. They must NOT go outside in a coop till they are at least 3 weeks old in warm weather. This will be longer in cold weather.
  2. Water dish or drinker, which should be shallow initially
  3. Food dish or specific feeder with chick crumb constantly available
  4. Warmth minimum 28C which can be reduced as they feather up. Suitable heat sources are electric hens, reptile heat mats or heat lamps. Bear in mind a possible fire risk from unsuitable equipment
  5. Safety from other animals including and especially other chickens
  6. Companion of other day old chicks because a solitary chick is very noisy indeed

Finally please dont ask us for young chicks if you have no equipment ready we will not sell them to you.

Warning!!!

Don’t expect that a broody hen will take on the day-old chicks you present her with. Always have a backup plan. Broodies can be remarkably fickle, moody and dangerous. Unless a hen is showing clear signs of being very broody then she will NOT look after chicks. She will more than likely try to kill them. If she has not looked after young chicks before then please supervise any introductions and be prepared to intervene quickly if she decides to attack the chicks.

Fox Proofing

Wiley Fox

Fox Proofing to protect your chickens

Fox proofing needs to be your primary focus when you design your chicken accommodation.

Foxes have a bad press, but well deserved. They are are probably quite misunderstood. We are not fans of foxes except they are beautiful creatures and have a purpose in the great scheme of nature to keep the balance right as a top predator.

With this in mind, the first thing you should do beyond all else is to foxproofing, foxproofing, foxproofing. If you don’t attend to this then your beloved chickens will be on the takeway menu of any resident fox in your area.

Foxes are indiscriminate killers aren’t they?

Foxes are misunderstood. Most people are of the opinion that foxes kill for fun. The reason they think this is that when a fox attacks, he will kill everything living in sight. Foxes like all other creatures only kill for survival. Yes it appears indiscriminate, but they have a cunning plan.

Whenever we humans think the shops are shut we will tend to fill our freezers, fridges and cupboards almost like the world is coming to an end. The fox has the same mentality. When food is plentiful, ie you have presented your lovely chickens to the fox on a plate then he is thinking that “I don’t know when I am going to get the opportunity to eat again so I will stockpile or cache the goods”. The equivalent of us going to do our Christmas shopping. While it is available, he is going to fill his cache with goodies.

A fox only has one mouth and he can only carry one at a time. By which time we have discovered his fowl deed (pun intended) and have gotten rather upset and have tidied up. Mr Renard is fully expecting to keep coming back and bury his goodies for lean times ahead.

So how do you fox-proof?

Any physical barriers you can place in the way for fox proofing the better. Firstly chicken wire is not fox-proof. It is only chicken-proof. It keeps chickens in but not foxes out.

Bury the wire at least 1 foot deep into the ground and also splay it out at right angles to your run sides along the ground the make a physical barrier to exclude Mr Fox. Paving slabs can be placed round the edge to make another no dig zone. Don’t forget the doorway or the roof. The more barriers you have the better. Make sure your nest boxes lids are well attached and securely bolted. Rooves should be well fitting and secure. Mesh should cover any ventilation points to exclude vermin. Most cheap wooden coops are not fox-proof. Don’t neglect the underside of your coop which is often used as an access point. These are often not screwed securely. Coops can easily tip over. Mr Fox knows this. He is wiley, strong and very persistent.

Materials used in fox-proofing

Weld-mesh with a minimum gauge of 16 and a small aperture. Two inch by two inch is not good enough. Foxes can get their mouths into that space and use it to overcome the barrier. A 1 inch mesh or smaller is better. Rats can get through 1 inch square mesh so a smaller space will exclude rats, and mink, stoat, pine marten, badgers and weasles also. These predators are all partial to a bit of takeaway chicken too. Weld-mesh is measured in gauges. The larger the gauge number the thinner the wire. 16g is better and stronger than 19g.

An excellent preventative obstacle is an electric chicken fence. The fencer has to be powerful enough to zap any vegetation. Vegetation can weaken the current the fencer is supplying and make the difference between a startling jolt and a slight tickle for a resourceful hungry fox especially one with a load of cubs to feed in spring.

What to guard against

Foxes can climb trees. They are excellent jumpers, easily clearing a 6 foot fence. They are formidable diggers so don’t assume you are safe if you have not made the perimeter fox-proof and secure.

Chicken Maths = How many chickens?

Chickens ready for sale

Today I spent a good few hours rearranging all my pens to keep the age groups in one place. I have chickens all over the place so it was time to make it more organised.

Well after I caught them up, they ran off, so I caught them again. They didn’t like their new pen because it was obviously a scary place. So inconsiderate! Considering I spent ages digging in some lime to disinfect the area. It also rearranged my hair as I got it caught in the netting. Dragged through a hedge backwards is a recurring theme for me these days. They then made a bolt for the door every time I brought another 2 over. I don’t know about them, but I found it quite stressful. It certainly increased my step count for the day according to my fitness phone app so not all bad!!

When I finally finished I took a picture so I could see what I had and which colour mixes I had. This is not the only batch of chickens I have either so I might have to give myself a stern talking to.

These are now ready to go to their new homes. We have Brahma in Pyle, and Buff Columbian. We have some Orpingtons in Lavender and some Swedish Flower Hens Crossed with either Leghorn or Ancona.

That moment when you realise exactly how many chickens you have. Chicken maths – aka chicken addiction – is a real thing, especially here.

For the uninitiated, the term Chicken Maths relates to a Phenomenon (excuse) for why numbers of chickens get out of control. It starts off by getting a flock of 3, then because you cannot add a single chicken to an existing flock, you end up with 2 more. If you lose one and need to replace it, you end up with another 2 minimum. And so it goes.

 

Bantams – 8 reasons why we don’t keep them

What is a Bantam

First of all, a bantam is a size of chicken, not a breed. They are divided into true bantams, which includes Pekins, Sebrights, Serema, Dutch and Booted bantams amongst others. True bantams have no large fowl equivalent. Many large fowl have a bantam equivalent, these are roughly a quarter of the size of the large fowl version. There is a bantam version of Wyandotte, Brahma, Leghorn, Sussex, Rhode Islands, Faverolles, Welsummer, Araucana to name a few.

An interesting fact regarding the Pekin and the Cochin which causes some confusion when viewing Facebook groups which have many nationalities as members. A Cochin has no bantam equivalent, however chicken keepers in the USA call Pekins a Cochin. As ever, the Americans are often at odds with the way we name stuff.

8 Reasons why we don’t keep bantams

  1. They are a quarter of the size of a regular chicken and they might not mix well in a large fowl flock
  2. They can have a “Napoleon Complex” which can actually show aggressive tendencies much bigger than their size in a mixed size flock. Sometimes bantam sized chickens can suffer with bullying when in with the bigger girls.
  3. They are usually very broody. Broody hens can be aggressive with other hens and also their keepers. Broody hens won’t lay eggs.
  4. They have repeated attacks of broodiness throughout the year and its often difficult to get them over it. Broodies can die from malnutrition or dehydration in particularly warm periods. The broodiest by reputation are Silkies, Goldtops, Pekins and Wyandottes.
  5. Their eggs are too small for your average chuckyegg. They need very small dippy soldiers to fit. Bring on those proper sized eggs!!
  6. They are no more easy to handle than large fowl even for children.
  7. The numbers of eggs are poor because they have repeated bouts of broodiness.
  8. They are more at risk of danger when a cat is involved or larger birds of prey.

We only stock Large Fowl

Large fowl and very large fowl can be just as friendly and cuddly as bantams. The largest chickens are fluff balls which are easy and calm to handle. They are not prone to panic running about as some bantams are. There is nothing standard about a chicken however as they all reserve the right to be individual characters, just like us.

Red Mite season

What is Red Mite

Red Mite is undoubtedly the chicken pest which is absolutely the scourge of chicken keepers. This evil chicken pest has earned its fearsome reputation. Why? It will hide in the tiniest of teeny tiny crevices, cracks or grooves in your coop by day. By night it will come hunting for a blood meal and your chickens are top choice of menu items.

Red Mite are the size of a full stop so how can they cause harm?

Well, it’s all to do with a numbers game. Red Mite will go from egg to egg laying adult in 7 days especially once the weather starts to warm up. A population explosion of these virtually invisible little ninjas will cause blood loss and death due to anaemia. Not to mention the diseases they carry. They can go dormant without food for months on end, only to reappear with a vengeance once food is available and the temperature increases. This is why you can never be complacent with these horrible little creatures.

So What are the Signs of Red Mite infestation?

The first indication you may notice could be that the chickens themselves tell you.

  • They will stop wanting to go into their coop at night and eggs may be randomly deposited outside.
  • Any eggs that are laid in the nest boxes may have small specs on them.
  • A visit to the coop at night-time will mean that you feel a rather uncomfortable creepy crawling sensation which seems to be caused by an invisible assailant.
  • Your chickens combs may become pale and they may look under the weather. Egg production will suffer – doesn’t it always – due to the stress it causes the ladies.
  • Little white flecks will be seen in and around obstacles. Red Mite discarded skeletons that they have grown out of.
  • Anaemia is a very real threat to their well-being and they can easily die.
  • You may spot piles of grey dust which will move in places like ledges and where perches attach.
  • Check round screws and nuts and bolts for small red dots as red mite cluster in these area most visibly. Open wood grain can also harbour sleeping red mite.

What can you do about Red Mite?

The Red Mite don’t live on the hens so treating the coop during day is not the best option as they are hiding inside crevices. Treating the hens themselves is also likely to be ineffective as an Ivermectin type treatment will require that the hens get bitten in order for the treatment to kill. Putting stuff in the water is also of very limited use as again the birds need to be bitten to treat.

Red Mite treatments need to be very proactive and aggressive to win this very serious war. Prevention is most definitely the best course.

The best treatments for Red Mite are nasty.  There is also an inconvenience factor that you can’t treat and put the chickens anywhere near it for about a week after.

Good Solutions

The top product for wooden coops is undoubtedly Creosote. The nasty cancer causing, banned for household use kind. You can get this online. Tame Creocote or Creoseal will not cut the mustard so don’t waste your time or money on this.  Creosote is usually applied yearly but the downside is that it will need to de-stink before you can let your hens have access to the coop again.

Next on the war list is Perbio-Choc or Ficam W. Both are residual and will give you protection for approximately 3 months. They are also nasty chemicals in their own right that do require hazmat style protection. Definitely eye, breathing, skin protection for these nasties. Also a de-stink period is needed of about a week. We use Perbio-Choc combined with a smoke bomb beforehand.

We have never used Ficam W but it is usually widely recommended by professional breeders.  Dergall is the new wonder treatment which claims to put a sort of sticky web that traps the mites and kills them. I am trialling a product which is cheaper than Dergall. It is called Mite Max which claims to do the same thing as Dergall.  I will let you know how that goes.

Questionable Solutions

Anecdotal evidence on Facebook forums say that Dettol pure and power, Jeyes fluid, Smite, blow torch, steam cleaning, jet washing, lime washing, diesel mixed with engine oil, siliconing, glossing etc have been used. One thing is for sure, desperate people clutch at all these straws with varying degrees of success or repeated dismal failures. Many “treatments” result in spectacular coop bonfires as a kill all or cure all solution.

When to treat

The best time to treat is night when this chicken pest is most active. Hens cannot obviously be in attendance. This will give your neighbours much amusement I am sure.

What most people don’t realise is that one treatment is rarely enough. You need to catch the hatching eggs also before they turn into adults themselves. Treatment has to be done at least every other day so watching the soaps or the football is not an option. Postponing the job is going to give you a bigger headache if you delay it. If you let the eggs hatch then you will be wasting your time and money. The Red Mite will win and your hens will be the losers. I cannot over-emphasise this.

Preventatives

At every clean you can give the wooden coop a good spraying with Poultry Shield followed by a dusting with diatom (mite killing diatomaceous earth). It has to say that it kills red mite otherwise it won’t. The laws have changed on how you can describe cheap ebay diatom (DE). The cheap stuff is not the good stuff. This should keep the coop fairly or completely free of mites. If you get complacent or lazy they will quite literally bite you on the bum. Smite is also supposed to be a good preventative. It’s is not a disinfectant though like Poultry Shield is.

Plastic coops are not immune

A lot of plastic coops have double skins which are a perfect unseen haven for the red mite. They do not have as many crevices as a wooden coop though and are easier to remove red mite from if you find them. Pressure washing is NOT a good way to deal with Red Mite. This will just blow them away but they will return. It wont kill them. The Poultry Shield and Diatom regime is great for plastic coops also unless you have an active infestation.

Monitoring

In time honoured Blue Peter style. If you take a used cardboard tube from the toilet roll and use this as a holder for a rolled up sheet of corrugated cardboard. Think of it as a serviette/napkin holder jobby. Place this somewhere in your coop such as attached to the underside of a perch. Periodically, unroll the cardboard and inspect it for this chicken pest. If you see a grey dust which will move when placed on your hand or red specks which are Red Mites which have recently fed within your “trap” you will need to treat your coop as a matter of urgency.

WARNING

This chicken pest can hitch a ride into your house so observe care you don’t introduce it to your sofa or bed as that would be a whole new world of pain.

Broody Hen

Broody chicken

Broody Hen – a blessing or a curse?

Broody hen season is upon us. This is where your chickens sit and sit and sit and sit. Even when you lift the hen out of her nest she remains in a sitting position like she has lost the use of her legs.

I have been waiting for any of my girls to go broody because the easiest way to care for eggs and then chicks is to get a mother hen to do it for you. It’s the lazy persons way, but the best and most natural way to raise chicks.

How do you know your hen is broody?

She will be making a noise that sounds like “clock” “clock” “clock. She will be flattened in the nest box. You may get pecked when you try to remove her as broodies can get rather moody and irritable. Every time you look for her she will still be there in residence.  When she moves around she will look and sound angry to the other hens and they will most likely attack her for her insolence if she is far enough down the pecking order.

What can you do to stop her being broody

Either you want her to hatch eggs, in which case add some fertile eggs under her. This is best done at night if she is a bit cantankerous. Or you will need to “break” her out of her broody phase.

Contrary to popular belief, broodies are not hot. Their body temperature is normally a little higher than our own. An egg needs incubating at 37.5C which is cooler than a hens normal temperature. Eggs overheat at the normal chicken temp so it would be a fair assumption that a broody is actually cooler than a normal hen. She will pluck her breast feathers so that she has less insulation.

To break her you will need to keep her in a cage such as a dog cage with a wire bottom. This is to make her uncomfortable and unable to nest. Put food and water in her cage as she will need to be kept in there day and night for at least 2 days. It is important she is safe from predators and the weather. Test her after 2 days. If she returns to her nest, add another day in the “broody gaol” until she is no longer wanting to sit.

You can also prevent her from getting anywhere she can make a nest by locking her out. Your other hens will need access to the nests however. She can go back in with the others overnight if you wish but turf her out each day until she gives up. Cage will take 2-4 days, lockout will take about the same.

Why do I need to break her

Broodies that do not have a job to do will only eat and drink once a day. They will lose condition if allowed to sit indefinitely. Some breeds can literally broody themselves to death. Either let her hatch or break her. She may have repeated episodes of broodiness if she is particularly prone to it. Silkies, Pekins, Wyandottes, Sussexes, Orpingtons are some of the most broody breeds.  If you are unhappy feeling cruel to be kind, then it is a good idea to avoid getting any of the above breeds.

 

 

New Delivery of Black Rocks

We are expecting a delivery of Black Rock hens and Brown Rock hens direct from the Muirfield hatchery week commencing 22nd June 2018. We will be getting several at point of lay (POL) and loads of cute fluffy day old female chicks.

Get in touch via our contact page if you would like to reserve any

How to keep your chickens warm this winter

Keeping chickens warm from the beast from the East is on everyone’s lips at the moment.  So what problems does this cause for chicken keepers? How do you keep chickens warm in the winter? The quick answer is that chickens are covered in their own feather duvets.  They are well able to keep themselves warm without any additional aids or methods.

Frostbite in below freezing temperatures may be an issue for hens or cockerels with large combs on their heads. As chickens remove the warm blood from their combs as the temperature plummets. This causes the comb to become cooler and vulnerable to frostbite. A slick of Vaseline over the fleshy parts will assist in keeping the comb protected. Keeping the coop ventilated will also help to keep it condensation free. It is the condensation which freezes and makes the combs succumb to ice crystals generated by the condensation. You will be helping in keeping chickens warm by making sure they stay dry also.

Chickens naturally cover their tootsies by lowering their feathers as they crouch down to roost overnight. This and tucking their heads under their wings help them keep their extremities warm and toasty. The picture above from a thermal imaging camera shows where the most heat loss is for chickens. Their heads and feet are showing up brighter. Their bodies are not losing much heat at all due their feathery coverage.

The most pressing issue for chickens in this weather is to keep their water free from ice so they can actually drink. Check on their water during the day to make sure. A heat plate or heated wire introduced into the drinker can assist in regions particularly affected by the cold wintery breath of the “beast”.

A chickens’ metabolism is active all night, so you can add a handful of  mixed corn to their diet late afternoon before bedtime. This heats them up from the inside as they digest it while they roost. It is tempting to give them warm porridge or any other warm human food, however, oats has the effect of cooling them down as it happens so is counter productive.